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Shelves: memoirs-and-bios. I've never read a memoir quite like this--from the perspective of a upper middle class African-American girl's experiences growing up in practically-gated Californian communities in the 70s.

The writing is strong and evocative, the time and place are unique, and you root for Jennifer who ends up being a professor at Yale.

Still, each chapter was a set piece and the themes well, theme, singular was repetitive: something shitty happened, and she learned something about being Black from it.

I f I've never read a memoir quite like this--from the perspective of a upper middle class African-American girl's experiences growing up in practically-gated Californian communities in the 70s.

I found myself craving more details about the day-to-day of her life--good and bad and shared and unique. And it was frustrating that there was so little included about her slightly older sister, who--to Jennifer's eyes, at least--managed to navigate school, life and identity more smoothly.

Feb 13, Barbara rated it really liked it. This book was well worth reading. I'm not sure if the author's voice got stronger and clearer as the book went on or if by that time I became fully tuned in, maybe that just paralelled her journey growing up.

Either way this vision of the "black struggle" adds to the literature as well as just being a pleasurable memoir to read on its own merits.

Apr 14, Nicholas Armstrong rated it did not like it. The biggest problem with this is that it is a memoir. As such, Baszile is restricted by the fences of realism and history.

The characters, as are most with nonfiction, aren't very well defined because they rely on memory to flesh them out and create them.

While I am sure that the author remembers her family vividly, they fade to a kind of dull shadow to me. This is something true of most memoirs, though.

The only discernible difference between this and other memoirs that I have read is that Basz The biggest problem with this is that it is a memoir.

The only discernible difference between this and other memoirs that I have read is that Baszile warbles from one event and time to another rather drastically.

Many of the chapters are just particular moments in time that become little more than the type of stories one would expect a family member to recount; "Did I ever tell you about my first job?

This is not In Cold Blood ; it is a recounting by a history professor. Intelligence, unfortunately, does not automatically create interesting writing.

This is the novels greatest fault. The writing is not very good. It is clear and distinct, but it is not interesting. The only thing that a memoir can do to hold on to interest is to focus on a moment of interest, as Night does with the Eli's journey through the concentration camps.

The most interesting moment in the novel was her father's battle with his past and his future, and yet we only get to see a fraction of this and then it slips beyond our view.

To put it simply, the novel just is not fun to read. It is dry and boring. Parts of this are important, and I'm glad I have the perspective of them, but it was a slog to get through.

I just finished this book for my book club. I'm really tired of reading books about the black experience.

First of all tell me something that is enlightening about what this black woman has experienced compared to many of us.

The characters were flat but then again this was her life and her family. I thought the father was abusive and a cheat but none of that was addressed but then again this is so common with most families trying to remain "Cosby" like to the world.

I thought she could explored I just finished this book for my book club. I thought she could explored more how she has developed as a women after going through her childhood but that was missing.

View all 8 comments. Feb 22, Lillian Daniel rated it it was amazing. This excellent memoir is even more timely today in an era when we really need to listen to each other's stories..

Smart, eloquent, funny and occasionally painful, the book is like the family it describes. Apr 21, Faye rated it it was ok. I thought this had more to do with growing up in a dysfunctional family than with being black in a mostly white neighborhood.

Jun 13, Jumana rated it really liked it Shelves: nonfiction , memoir. In her memoir, Jennifer Baszile reminisces about growing up as an outsider in the community where she lives, but also finding herself unable to fit in with the rest of her relatives and other black folks who grew up in all-black communities.

I was able to relate to both sides of that coin! Kids of immigrants face the exact same challenges. Braszile encounters everything from outright racist comments, to being considered "exotic," to not finding appropriate makeup shades.

Reading this book reminded me how grateful I am that my kids are growing up in a more accepting multicultural environment.

For those of us older than 30 - remember when there were very few black or brown folks on television, in the movies, or in magazines?

The lack of diversity in the entertainment industry was so extreme that I was actually excited when a white actor portrayed a stereotypical Indian character in the movie "Short Circuit.

There is still work to be done, of course. But I'm taking a moment to thank all of the heroic individuals that paved the way for us today.

Mar 08, Joel rated it liked it. I enjoyed having access to the stories that Baszile shares. They were powerful, compelling, and complicated. But the writing did not always do justice to the stories; the perspective of the narrator child's recollections?

Feb 14, Linda Layne rated it liked it. I found this book difficult to rate. I enjoyed Ms. Baszile's writing, it was parts of her story that I found disturbing.

Let me explain. Several months ago, after hearing a black friend of mine say that many blacks are tired of "explaining" the black experience to their white friends, that they should take some responsibility and read and learn on their own, I have begun to do just that.

The library Black history month display caught my attention and there among the books was the yellow book, "T I found this book difficult to rate.

The library Black history month display caught my attention and there among the books was the yellow book, "The Black Girl Next Door. I did enjoy the book until I began to get a deeper understanding of the family dynamics that she grew up with.

Now, don't get me wrong, I do not believe that her family dynamics were because she was black or grew up in a black family per se, but she did explain that as a child felt it necessary that she prove to her parents she was, in her words, "black enough," because her parents decided to raise her and her sister in a white, middle class neighborhood.

I was also particularly disturbed how her father bullied her family. Again, do I believe this occurs only in black families?

Being raised by a white, working class mother, divorced read abandoned with some financial assistance from maternal grandparents, I have no experience from which to draw my opinion, other than what I read or remember from classmates.

I recall a friend who the summer he grew several inches that his father took him up the to the attic and proceeded to pummel him with his fists in order to remind him that as the son, he would obey his father or their would be dire consequences.

So, bullying is not limited by race or economic boundaries. I did learn many interesting things about black hair care, etc. And overall, the book is very well written.

Aug 16, OOSA rated it it was amazing. Another Shade of Blackness This is a rather unique perspective into growing up Black in an America when you have atypical economic circumstances but still suffer some of the stereotypical abuses of African Americans while trying to establish an identity that will let you survive.

Poignant, compelling, and insightful is the author's perspective on the subculture of her family surrounded by non-white neighbors and friends.

She struggles to identify while assimilating the values of the dominant grou Another Shade of Blackness This is a rather unique perspective into growing up Black in an America when you have atypical economic circumstances but still suffer some of the stereotypical abuses of African Americans while trying to establish an identity that will let you survive.

She struggles to identify while assimilating the values of the dominant group and has feelings of alienation and isolation before she is able to unravel the complexities of her existence.

Ambivalence toys with her mentally and emotionally in her formative years before the formulation of the questions that bother her until she becomes strong enough of integrity to accept the answer.

The voice is unique in the African American experience because it assumes that the leveling of the economic playing field and the exposure to upper middle class standards would impact the African American experience substantially.

Instead, we are shown that there are some racial issues that must be confronted regardless of social class or strata. The story allows you to cry at the author's hurt yet rejoice in her triumphs.

I found "The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir" surprisingly challenging as it forced me to confront some of my own values and demanded a review of personal prejudices.

It is well written and evokes formulating and reformulated opinions on the role of racism in America. As the setting of the child changes, you get glimpses into her extended family and their feelings and ideas on race as well as school, church, neighborhood and personal evaluation when she realizes that there can be advantages to being African American, although it comes at the cost of taking advantage of the ignorance of non-black Americans.

I look forward to reading her again as it is semi-documentary with a realistic story and a perspective that is limited in the literature.

Reviewed by: Gail View 1 comment. May 12, Betsy rated it really liked it. This memoir of an African-American woman whose parents, having survived segregation in Detroit and blatant racism in Louisiana, have worked hard in order to raise their two daughters in the almost all-white enclave of Palos Verdes, an upscale suburb of Los Angeles.

When Jennifer and the other little girl go to their teacher to decide this argument, the teacher sides with the claim of the special feet!

Jennifer's father ends up having to go to the school to straighten out the teacher and the parent and Jennifer's friendship with the little girl dissolves.

Along with these types of experiences, she is also up against her parents' expectations - her father's comment - "I did not raise you for a white man I found the narrative engrossing for the most part and it kept me going fairly quickly all the way through.

In the final couple of chapters, Jennifer finally meets other "minority" students like herself at a summer business program and it gives her hope that she will be able to escape the family that, while they love her, also don't always give her the room to be herself.

Baszile has gone on to find her niche in the world of academia, according to the blurb at the back of the book, which makes this read that much more satisfying.

It's good to see a strong smart black woman succeed. Apr 01, Diane rated it really liked it. At an early age, Jennifer, her parents and sister Natalie moved to a predominately white neighborhood in Palos Verdes, CA.

Her parents had only wanted the best for their daughters, but growing up at that time with white classmates was not always easy.

For example, at the age of six , after winning a foot race against a white classmate, the author was humiliated to hear The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir, by Jennifer Baszelle is a touching story about a black girl growing up in the 70's and 80's.

For example, at the age of six , after winning a foot race against a white classmate, the author was humiliated to hear her classmate explain that the reason she won the race was because black people "have something in their feet to make them run faster than white people".

When Jennifer asked her teacher about this, the teacher said it was true! When she asked her parents the same question, they were stunned and the next morning, Jennifer's father accompanied her to school, careful to "assert himself as an informed and concerned parent and not simply a big, black, dangerous man in a first-grade classroom.

An apology was given by the teacher, however, comments like this pretty much set the tone for her grade school years, which left her often with feelings of isolation.

Having excelled in school, her parents pushed her and her sister to believe in and to live the American dream. Sometimes defying her parents, but through self-determination, success followed as the author became the first black female History professor at Yale.

An interesting memoir, candid, and inspirational, although a bit slow in places, gave me real insight as to how it might have felt to be Jennifer growing up in the post Civil Rights 70's and 80's.

Aug 29, SundayAtDusk rated it it was amazing Shelves: memoirs-black. Jennifer Baszile does a terrific job describing her childhood in a mostly white, upper-class neighborhood.

This is not a book by an angry woman, or one trying to find fault with others. It is just an honest description of growing up a black girl surrounded by white tennis players, and kids who like to listen to Beach Boys music, while getting tans at the beach.

The author does her best to fit in, but realizes she's not where she really belongs. Her parents send her mixed messages about race, too Jennifer Baszile does a terrific job describing her childhood in a mostly white, upper-class neighborhood.

Her parents send her mixed messages about race, too; they insist she fit into her white schools and neighborhood, while also insisting she associate with black kids because she is black.

There was one truly bizarre incident while on a family cruise, where Ms. Baszile's parents angrily accuse her and her sister of ignoring black children on the ship, and demand they introduce themselves to all of the black children, before returning to their cabin for the day.

They even take away their cabin keys. The whole incident was so strange, one can only wonder if the author considered the idea her parents just wanted to be alone in the cabin together, and created that whole drama to do so.

If they did, that was a big mistake for them; for that was one of the big turning points in the author's childhood; that was the beginning of her recognition that it was ridiculous for her parents to move into a neighborhhod that was almost all white, and then act like their daughters weren't making enough effort to be black.

One could only cheer her on at the end of the book, where she boards a plane for college in New York City. Sep 20, D. Eric rated it liked it Shelves: memoir-autobiography.

Living in the same general area as the main character in the book, though I did not grow up there, I looked forward to seeing what I missed in my youth.

It appears I missed quite a bit, though that might be a good thing. Jennifer Baszile writes a sometimes intriguing book about life as a black girl in a white neighborhood.

It's not just her story, but that of her whole family and the community of Palos Verde, California. On the good side Baszile presents events honestly and openly; on the bad sid Living in the same general area as the main character in the book, though I did not grow up there, I looked forward to seeing what I missed in my youth.

On the good side Baszile presents events honestly and openly; on the bad side, she does not paint a picture of her family that seems to back the loving praise she gives it in her acknowledgments.

Also, many things are left unanswered her mother and father's ultimate relationship because of his affairs or incomplete what happened to her savior from the summer college trip?

Although Baszile definitely shows the problems she had growing up in a rich, white suburb, she does not seem to to give the dysfunctional families of her mother and father as much blame as they might deserve regarding her self esteem and mental health.

In spite of the shortcomings mentioned above, this is still a good book and well worth reading, especially if you want a glimpse of Southern California's South Bay area in the 70s and 80s and how it dealt with racial issues.

Jan 09, DMD rated it liked it. On one hand, this book reminded me of growing up in predominantly white areas but on the other, it didn't really say anything new to me.

It actually surprised me how similar a lot of my experiences were to those depicted in the book, especially when considering that I am part of the model minority.

The parts that really struck me was towards the end, when Baszile went more into how her parents handled their lives in the affluent Palos Verdes, California after growing up in Detroit and Louisiana On one hand, this book reminded me of growing up in predominantly white areas but on the other, it didn't really say anything new to me.

The parts that really struck me was towards the end, when Baszile went more into how her parents handled their lives in the affluent Palos Verdes, California after growing up in Detroit and Louisiana and the toll it took on them.

I wish Baszile had explored that more rather than just the one or two chapters at the end. There, she focused on her feelings as a teenager and blamed them for forcing integration on her.

She wishes they were asked "Why all this relentless achievement? Perhaps it's my second generation viewpoint, but Baszile was unable to appreciate all they did for her.

Had she been able to delve more into her parents motivations and background, I think it would have been a better book.

Sep 20, Jennifer rated it liked it. I read this book since Jennifer went to my high school and her Mom lives around the corner from my Mom's house.

Interesting to read about the streets and location in my childhood that I also experienced. But Jennifer had a very different experience than I did.

At first I felt offended that she didn't appreciate the offerings that Palos Verdes brings to the table beauty, education, opportunity and I was sad that PV was painted to be a haughty, judgmental society at the hands of a few poor choi I read this book since Jennifer went to my high school and her Mom lives around the corner from my Mom's house.

At first I felt offended that she didn't appreciate the offerings that Palos Verdes brings to the table beauty, education, opportunity and I was sad that PV was painted to be a haughty, judgmental society at the hands of a few poor choice incidents.

But then I started to see things through her family and cultural background and see how it would be isolating. That said, it could have been isolating and equally hard or awkward for any teen, let alone by race.

Her honesty about her feelings and the family dysfunction was refreshing. And the drive of her entire family is admirable, but I can't help but feel sad for the lonliness it breeds.

Another reviewer summed it up best when they said that this book was more about a dysfunctional family then a black girl in a white community.

Though I'd love to hear what Jennifer feels affected her most I'm on to her sister's novel, Queen Bee, which was picked up by Oprah network to be made into a movie.

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GO CATCH UP ON \ Aug 16, OOSA rated it it was amazing. Baszile was a history professor at Yale, and took on the book in order to tell her personal history. While Tanner mayes young hot and horny her way in a White world, she and her sister also struggle Comdot game their parents, who fear that their Full sex comics are not Bl Baszile writes about growing up a member of one of two Black families in affluent White Palos Verde, California in the s. Walmart mandates masks in stores. Showing

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Meet Miss Momo, the sweetest squirrel ever. Young kittens taste meat for the first time. WW2 war veteran has an unbelievable singing voice.

Doggy sits upright to watch his favorite movie. Bus driver herds geese away from busy intersection.

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Graphic Video: Nurses Caught In Sex Acts Next To Stroke Victim Two local nurses were allegedly recorded on surveillance video performing sexual acts in front of a year-old stroke patient under their care.

When Jennifer and the other little girl go to their teacher to decide this argument, the teacher sides with the claim of the special feet! Jennifer's father ends up having to go to the school to straighten out the teacher and the parent and Jennifer's friendship with the little girl dissolves.

Along with these types of experiences, she is also up against her parents' expectations - her father's comment - "I did not raise you for a white man I found the narrative engrossing for the most part and it kept me going fairly quickly all the way through.

In the final couple of chapters, Jennifer finally meets other "minority" students like herself at a summer business program and it gives her hope that she will be able to escape the family that, while they love her, also don't always give her the room to be herself.

Baszile has gone on to find her niche in the world of academia, according to the blurb at the back of the book, which makes this read that much more satisfying.

It's good to see a strong smart black woman succeed. Apr 01, Diane rated it really liked it. At an early age, Jennifer, her parents and sister Natalie moved to a predominately white neighborhood in Palos Verdes, CA.

Her parents had only wanted the best for their daughters, but growing up at that time with white classmates was not always easy.

For example, at the age of six , after winning a foot race against a white classmate, the author was humiliated to hear The Black Girl Next Door: A Memoir, by Jennifer Baszelle is a touching story about a black girl growing up in the 70's and 80's.

For example, at the age of six , after winning a foot race against a white classmate, the author was humiliated to hear her classmate explain that the reason she won the race was because black people "have something in their feet to make them run faster than white people".

When Jennifer asked her teacher about this, the teacher said it was true! When she asked her parents the same question, they were stunned and the next morning, Jennifer's father accompanied her to school, careful to "assert himself as an informed and concerned parent and not simply a big, black, dangerous man in a first-grade classroom.

An apology was given by the teacher, however, comments like this pretty much set the tone for her grade school years, which left her often with feelings of isolation.

Having excelled in school, her parents pushed her and her sister to believe in and to live the American dream. Sometimes defying her parents, but through self-determination, success followed as the author became the first black female History professor at Yale.

An interesting memoir, candid, and inspirational, although a bit slow in places, gave me real insight as to how it might have felt to be Jennifer growing up in the post Civil Rights 70's and 80's.

Aug 29, SundayAtDusk rated it it was amazing Shelves: memoirs-black. Jennifer Baszile does a terrific job describing her childhood in a mostly white, upper-class neighborhood.

This is not a book by an angry woman, or one trying to find fault with others. It is just an honest description of growing up a black girl surrounded by white tennis players, and kids who like to listen to Beach Boys music, while getting tans at the beach.

The author does her best to fit in, but realizes she's not where she really belongs. Her parents send her mixed messages about race, too Jennifer Baszile does a terrific job describing her childhood in a mostly white, upper-class neighborhood.

Her parents send her mixed messages about race, too; they insist she fit into her white schools and neighborhood, while also insisting she associate with black kids because she is black.

There was one truly bizarre incident while on a family cruise, where Ms. Baszile's parents angrily accuse her and her sister of ignoring black children on the ship, and demand they introduce themselves to all of the black children, before returning to their cabin for the day.

They even take away their cabin keys. The whole incident was so strange, one can only wonder if the author considered the idea her parents just wanted to be alone in the cabin together, and created that whole drama to do so.

If they did, that was a big mistake for them; for that was one of the big turning points in the author's childhood; that was the beginning of her recognition that it was ridiculous for her parents to move into a neighborhhod that was almost all white, and then act like their daughters weren't making enough effort to be black.

One could only cheer her on at the end of the book, where she boards a plane for college in New York City. Sep 20, D. Eric rated it liked it Shelves: memoir-autobiography.

Living in the same general area as the main character in the book, though I did not grow up there, I looked forward to seeing what I missed in my youth.

It appears I missed quite a bit, though that might be a good thing. Jennifer Baszile writes a sometimes intriguing book about life as a black girl in a white neighborhood.

It's not just her story, but that of her whole family and the community of Palos Verde, California. On the good side Baszile presents events honestly and openly; on the bad sid Living in the same general area as the main character in the book, though I did not grow up there, I looked forward to seeing what I missed in my youth.

On the good side Baszile presents events honestly and openly; on the bad side, she does not paint a picture of her family that seems to back the loving praise she gives it in her acknowledgments.

Also, many things are left unanswered her mother and father's ultimate relationship because of his affairs or incomplete what happened to her savior from the summer college trip?

Although Baszile definitely shows the problems she had growing up in a rich, white suburb, she does not seem to to give the dysfunctional families of her mother and father as much blame as they might deserve regarding her self esteem and mental health.

In spite of the shortcomings mentioned above, this is still a good book and well worth reading, especially if you want a glimpse of Southern California's South Bay area in the 70s and 80s and how it dealt with racial issues.

Jan 09, DMD rated it liked it. On one hand, this book reminded me of growing up in predominantly white areas but on the other, it didn't really say anything new to me.

It actually surprised me how similar a lot of my experiences were to those depicted in the book, especially when considering that I am part of the model minority.

The parts that really struck me was towards the end, when Baszile went more into how her parents handled their lives in the affluent Palos Verdes, California after growing up in Detroit and Louisiana On one hand, this book reminded me of growing up in predominantly white areas but on the other, it didn't really say anything new to me.

The parts that really struck me was towards the end, when Baszile went more into how her parents handled their lives in the affluent Palos Verdes, California after growing up in Detroit and Louisiana and the toll it took on them.

I wish Baszile had explored that more rather than just the one or two chapters at the end. There, she focused on her feelings as a teenager and blamed them for forcing integration on her.

She wishes they were asked "Why all this relentless achievement? Perhaps it's my second generation viewpoint, but Baszile was unable to appreciate all they did for her.

Had she been able to delve more into her parents motivations and background, I think it would have been a better book. Sep 20, Jennifer rated it liked it.

I read this book since Jennifer went to my high school and her Mom lives around the corner from my Mom's house.

Interesting to read about the streets and location in my childhood that I also experienced. But Jennifer had a very different experience than I did.

At first I felt offended that she didn't appreciate the offerings that Palos Verdes brings to the table beauty, education, opportunity and I was sad that PV was painted to be a haughty, judgmental society at the hands of a few poor choi I read this book since Jennifer went to my high school and her Mom lives around the corner from my Mom's house.

At first I felt offended that she didn't appreciate the offerings that Palos Verdes brings to the table beauty, education, opportunity and I was sad that PV was painted to be a haughty, judgmental society at the hands of a few poor choice incidents.

But then I started to see things through her family and cultural background and see how it would be isolating. That said, it could have been isolating and equally hard or awkward for any teen, let alone by race.

Her honesty about her feelings and the family dysfunction was refreshing. And the drive of her entire family is admirable, but I can't help but feel sad for the lonliness it breeds.

Another reviewer summed it up best when they said that this book was more about a dysfunctional family then a black girl in a white community.

Though I'd love to hear what Jennifer feels affected her most I'm on to her sister's novel, Queen Bee, which was picked up by Oprah network to be made into a movie.

Feb 15, Melissa rated it really liked it. Wow, I don't know where to begin, this book was incredible.

As an African-American woman and the same age as the author, I could so relate to this book and her experiences. While reading the book I came to realize that post 60's black kids are really not that different from first generation immigrant kids.

Our parents all want the best for us yet at the same time w Wow, I don't know where to begin, this book was incredible. In the book, Jennifer suggests this parental pressure turns into an internal rage.

I, myself, have felt rage and wondered where it came from, perhaps this pressure is a plausible explanation that may need more research.

Jennifer's straight forward and honest writing draws you into her emotional tales and experiences. Issues of classmate and sometimes teacher issues, friendship, appearance, young love, and family situations are common themes that everyone can relate to.

May 28, Iman Sellars rated it really liked it Recommends it for: A young soul on the way to self discovery. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. With this rare overlooked topic of black families in all white neighborhoods, Baszile uncovers a new form of unnamed discrimination.

The telling of her experience is relatable and comical, seeing as she puts many of her childhood miseries throughout the book.

I do caution, this story may not be relatable to all people. I myself found this story to be extremely relatable, as I am going through the same experience.

If you are interested in this book, it should be approached without bias or judgement. Apr 05, Meadow Frisbie rated it liked it. Jen lives with her family in a upscale all white neighborhood.

Where 'fitting in' means everything to her, and 'staying black' means everything to her parents. She grows up trying to find the perfect balance and staying true to her heritage in a post-cival war era.

My favorite part is that every once in awhile they will have a picture taken of the real Jennifer. If you are reading about when she was 9 and wearing some silly costume Even though never stated, her family fell apart.

Her parents tried their best in her early years. But as she grew up, her parents rarely gave her reasons for what they belived or wanted her to do.

Her father started sliding and Jennifer had to physically defend herself on one of his bad days. When she was looking for colleges; she found the farthest one away and ran for it.

The first half was a great eye opener to what kind of world she had to grow up in, but the last half was depressing when she found she would never truely fit in.

I loved this book. It was tough to read through all of the trauma that Jennifer and her family had been through in upper middle class suburbia.

Her reminiscences of childhood and adolescent years during the 70s and 80s in post integration Socal proves that racial issues did exist in the west unlike what many believe.

Her stories are go through the history of her family, in America, and about the state at which she was coming of age.

From her school life, social life, and family life, Jennifer ha I loved this book. From her school life, social life, and family life, Jennifer had to overcome many obstacles that shaped her into the women she is today.

At times I could relate to many of Jennifer's experiences as I was brought up as a minority during my childhood and adolescents. It's painful to have your classmates ask you uncomfortable questions or look at you funny when they talk about "black people" but these are things that you have to shrug off and move on.

The book has lots of climaxes and every part of her life has some kind of turn. I recommend this book at anyone who has grown in a similar situation and could relate.

Feb 09, Betsy rated it really liked it Recommends it for: my siblings, barbara, emma. What's it like to be "the black girl next door" in an overwhelmingly white aand affluent Los Angeles suburb?

Now 40 and a history professor at Yale, Baszile tells it like it was - and it's often painful. Although the white folks are generally nice to her and her family with the noteable exception of some horrendous graffiti spraypainted on their new house Baszile often feels like a fish out of water, even with some of the other affluent black kids - from the Black preppies to the BAPS Black Am What's it like to be "the black girl next door" in an overwhelmingly white aand affluent Los Angeles suburb?

Although the white folks are generally nice to her and her family with the noteable exception of some horrendous graffiti spraypainted on their new house Baszile often feels like a fish out of water, even with some of the other affluent black kids - from the Black preppies to the BAPS Black American Princesses.

There are painful moments during a free "makeover" at a department store makeup counter, at a school dance and on a ritzy cruise ship. Her parents, who have pulled themselves up and out of rural Louisiana and Detroit at considerable cost, are sadly and understandably conflicted about the life they're worked so hard to provide their daughters.

Made me think of what some of the black students at Cranbrook may have been going through May 13, Angela rated it liked it Recommended to Angela by: nytimes.

I enjoyed Baszile's memoir of being an upper middle class black girl in the mostly white community of Rancho Palos Verdes. Baszile grows up with a pair of type-A parents who have worked exhaustingly for everything they have, and she doesn't fit in either with her white beach bum peers or with working class blacks.

Her I enjoyed Baszile's memoir of being an upper middle class black girl in the mostly white community of Rancho Palos Verdes. Her beautiful, homecoming queen sister seems to have an easier time at life, and Jennifer constantly feels like an outsider.

Despite all of our differences I found much to identify with in Baszile's occasional isolation, and also learned a great deal.

Jul 07, Joanne rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. Baszile writes about growing up a member of one of two Black families in affluent White Palos Verde, California in the s.

They're greeted with racist graffiti on their sidewalk and she and her sister are one of the few Black kids in their school.

She holds herself apart from intimate friendships and romance, having learned that they eventually butt up against race. While making her way in a White world, she and her sister also struggle with their parents, who fear that their girls are not Bl Baszile writes about growing up a member of one of two Black families in affluent White Palos Verde, California in the s.

While making her way in a White world, she and her sister also struggle with their parents, who fear that their girls are not Black enough.

Integration was complicated for her. The first two-thirds of the book are riveting. The last third, as she enters adolescence and begins to see and rebel against the dysfunctional side of her high-achieving family, are full of less engaging long reflections and analysis about her family dynamics.

Baszile was a history professor at Yale, and took on the book in order to tell her personal history. Feb 18, David added it Shelves: memoirs , justicenonfiction.

This is another pick for the antiRacist reading group. From the beginning the author demonstrates the challenge of her African-American family trying to achieve the American-suburbanite-Dream in the context of their white community.

Becoming a suburbanite seems to be one defining element of becoming "white" rather than "white-ethnic" this same aspiration seemed to shape the trajectory of Baszile's African-American family.

However their legacy of segregation was dramatically different than white- This is another pick for the antiRacist reading group. However their legacy of segregation was dramatically different than white-ethnics and hence the family continues to be unable to become peacefully and respectfully integrated into their community.

This memoir contains a lot of great reflection and description of growing up as a black girl in a wealthy Californian suburb.

It was quick to read and Baszile's upfront honesty about her family's struggles is completely illuminating.

May 03, Jodi rated it liked it. My neighbor and mentor read this book. We had both committed on the book at one time and thought it might be an interesting read.

She read it and then her husband so I read it next. It was pretty good. THe main character is taken out of a black school and put into a white one with her sister.

She remembers have vandalism done to her home and her parents reactions. I did find similairites to my life which I found intersting.

My father was very strict like hers and his way was the only way. My her My neighbor and mentor read this book. My her also feared my father and at times made decisions that I thought were harfmful to look good to others.

We had a fake outer life that was not the same as the inner life we led. It was all about image and perserving that image no matter what.

Lessons learned in childhood stay with you for your life and mold you into the person you are. Sep 01, Wil Davenport rated it it was amazing.

First, I need to acknowledge that I'm a white guy, clueless about life as an African American in a white community. I appreciated Jennifer's story so much, giving me a glimpse into the struggles and challenges she faced.

Jennifer is an extraordinary woman not because of her success in a white world but because of her tenacity, brilliance, and beauty. Mar 26, Jenni rated it it was ok.

It's an interesting autobiography but I was really disappointed in how the book was concluded. I felt like it lacked closure from the standpoint of not know how this woman's childhood really affected her adulthood and some of the decision she would have made based on her experiences.

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